OTREC Events

November 2014


LRT and BRT and CRT and SCT… Oh My!

November 4, 2014 10:00 am - November 4, 2014 11:15 am

A sneak peek into the development outcomes associated with different fixed-guideway transit systems

NITC Webinar

For nearly three years, researchers supported by the National Institute of Transportation and Communities have been analyzing the development outcomes associated with light rail, bus rapid, commuter rail, and street car transit in about 20 metropolitan areas ranging from 500,000 to 5 million people. Development outcomes include: jobs by economic sector and wage levels; population by key household types and householder age; and market-based property values and rent levels. Their analysis is longitudinal allowing for comparisons of shares and shifts in shares over time, as well as the extent to which transit-served corridors are more resilient to such economic shocks as the Great Recession than comparable corridors or their metropolitan areas as a whole. This "sneak peek" Webinar will showcase key findings before they are published.
 
Arthur C. Nelson is professor of urban planning and real estate development at the University of Arizona where he serves as associate dean for research in the College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture. He is also presidential professor emeritus of city & metropolitan planning at the University of Utah. For NITC, HUD, and other sponsors, Dr. Nelson and his team have pioneered new insights into how the residential market values proximity to rail transit (which extends well beyond the customary half-mile circle), the economic development implications of bus rapid transit, and new measures of TOD effects on socio-demographic and development outcomes.
 
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REGISTER
 
The webinar is free through registration; early registration is encouraged. The webinar will be administered through GoToWebinar; an archived video and slides will be posted after the webinar. 
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Continuing Education Credits: This 60-minute webinar provides one hour of training which equals 1 CM or 1 PDH. IBPI applies to the AICP for Certification Maintenance credit for each webinar. We will provide an attendance certificate to those who document their professional development hours.
 
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LRT and BRT and CRT and SCT… Oh My!

October 2014


IBPI Trail Design Workshop

October 30, 2014 8:59 am - October 31, 2014 11:59 am

Fourth Avenue Building, Suite 175 Conference Room, Portland State University
Course Faculty: Robin WilcoxGeorge Hudson, and Karen Vitkay of Alta Planning + Design.

This is a highly interactive 1.5 day course that includes classroom presentations on trail design, and field tour of some of the biggest trail challenges and best solutions in Portland. The classroom overview will include discussions of trail widths, surfacing, road crossings, safety, user types, trail types, including rails with trails, and more using examples from the best trails around the country. The field tour will take participants along the I-205 path highlighting connections to Portland's light rail system, along the Springwater Corridor including places where the route follows neighborhood greenways, and along the Eastbank Esplanade. Participants are encouraged to bring examples of trail challenges in their community. Suggestions may be trail gaps, difficult crossings, and challenging connections to the on-street network. We will work as a group to examine issues, find precedents, and sketch potential solutions.

Who Should Attend: Professionals who are planning, designing or advocating for bicycle and pedestrian networks at the community or regional level. The course is also open to engineering and planning students.

For more information or to register for the workshop, click here.
 
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IBPI Trail Design Workshop

September 2014


Collaboration between Universities and Cities to Create Sustainable Communities

October 2, 2014 9:00 am - October 2, 2014 10:00 am

Speaker: 
Marc Schlossberg and Nico Larco, University of Oregon
Cost: 
Free and open to the public

Please join us for a free webcast on Thursday, October 2, 2014 from 12:00 to 1:00 PM Eastern Time, or 9:00 to 10:00 am Pacific.

This webcast is hosted by the Center for Urban Transportation Research at the University of South Florida and presented by Marc Schlossberg and Nico Larco of the University of Oregon. USF and UO are both member universities in the NITC program.

The presentation relates to Larco and Schlossberg's NITC research about the Sustainable City Year Program (SCYP).

Pre-registration is not required. For those unable to attend, the webcast will be recorded and available within 48 hours at www.cutr.usf.edu.

Summary:

Transportation agencies are grappling with new and unfamiliar issues within their domain, from addressing big problems like climate change to focusing on accessibility, where land use, urban design, and active transportation modes are more important. These challenges come at a time when the resources necessary to meet them are scarce and many agency staff members are reaching retirement.

At the same time, Universities continue to attract a new generation of students who are not only comfortable and familiar with these new concepts, but are eager for a workplace that embraces this multi-disciplinary environment.  Many university students are desperately hungry to engage in experiential learning where their learning and fresh thinking could be directed toward real-world problems, but opportunities where their energy can make an actual impact are rare and typically isolated by discipline.

This talk focuses on a unique experiment begun in Oregon and now being adapted in seventeen States and two countries  that simultaneously trains students from across disciplines for careers engaged with transportation issues and helps local cities move forward with a variety of livability efforts.  Each year, the University of Oregon’s Sustainable City Year Program (SCYP) works with a single city and connects 25-30 courses across 10-12 disciplines, 500+ students, and 60,000+ hours of effort to community projects identified by city staff.  The scale of engagement matters and because the model is based on existing classes taught by existing faculty in their existing ways, it is an extremely replicable model to all types of institutions and their particular sets of expertise. Transportation projects have been a core part of the work and have come from planning, engineering, architecture, landscape architecture, digital arts, public administration, geography, economics, journalism, arts administration, and law – an unprecedented diversity of disciplined focusing on real-world, city-identified needs.

In 2010, the New York Times called the University of Oregon’s Sustainable City Year Program (SCYP) “perhaps the most comprehensive effort by a U.S. university to infuse sustainability into its curricula and community outreach,” and in 2013, the Chronicle of Higher Education called the model “one of higher education’s most successful and comprehensive service-learning programs.”   This talk will provide additional details of this catalytic learning model, explain how it works, and lay out how universities and communities can work together in new ways to meet our changing transportation challenges.

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Evaluating the Level-of-Service of Protected Bike Lanes

September 25, 2014 10:00 am - September 25, 2014 11:15 am

The most recent edition of the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) contains analysis procedures for measuring the level-of-service (LOS), also referred to as quality of service, provided by an urban roadway to bicyclists. The method uses different design and operating features of the roadway segment (e.g. width, motor vehicle volumes and speeds) to assess an LOS grade of A (best) to F (worst). These procedures are used by planners and engineers to recommend how existing streets could be retrofitted or new streets designed to better serve people on bicycles (and other modes). However, the current HCM does not include methods that address protected bike lanes (aka “cycle tracks” or “separated bike lanes”), only conventional striped bike lanes, shoulders, and shared streets. There are other methods for predicting comfort from a bicyclist’s perspective that do consider protected bike lanes, but they are either based only on expert opinion or on surveys in Denmark.

This presentation will describe how to evaluate the level-of-service of a protected bike lane using results from surveys conducted in the United States. The model developed by this project could be used to supplement the current HCM to objectively consider a wider range of options for improving the environment for bicycling. This is increasingly important as the implementation of, and demand for, protected bike lanes surges around the US.

This seminar is eligible for 1 hour of professional development credit. IBPI applies to the AICP for Certification Maintenance credit for each webinar. We will provide an electronic attendance certificate for other types of certification maintenance.

For more information or to register for this free webinar, click here.

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Evaluating the Level-of-Service of Protected Bike Lanes

2014 Oregon Transportation Summit

September 15, 2014 8:00 am - September 15, 2014 5:00 pm

Preliminary Agenda (Note some changes from previous years):

8:00 - 9:00     Registration, Light Breakfast and Poster Exhibit

9:00 - 10:30     Plenary Session

10:30 - 11:00     Break, Refreshments, Poster Exhibit

11:00 - 12:30     Morning Workshops (four tracks)

12:30 - 2:00     Lunch , OTREC Awards, Keynote

2:00 - 2:30     Break, Book Signing, Refreshments, Poster Exhibit

2:30 - 4:00     Afternoon Workshops (four tracks)

Registration is now open.

More details about the event can be found here.

If you have suggestions or questions about the program, please contact Susan Peithman (peithman@pdx.edu). If you have questions about registration, please contact Renata Tirta (rtirta@pdx.edu, 503-725-2863).

August 2014


Comprehensive Bicycle Design & Engineering 2.0

August 25, 2014 8:00 am - August 29, 2014 5:00 pm

Comprehensive Bicycle Design & Engineering 2.0
Where: Room 315 (ITS Lab), Engineering Building, Portland State University
Course Faculty: Mia Birk, Alta Planning + Design; Peter Koonce, Portland Bureau of Transportation; and other instructors TBA
Summary: This Initiative for Bicycle and Pedestrian Innovation (IBPI) course will cover the fundamentals of bikeway planning and design through an intensive week of interactive classroom and field experience. It will bring you up to speed on the cutting edge in practice and research and offer valuable skills for your professional life. Instructors will integrate transit access and connections, bridges, trail crossings, and other special features into discussions, while using project examples to highlight practical applications of the principles and techniques covered.

Topics will include:

    Protected bikeways
    Suburban and rural design
    Bicycle facility design of intersections, crossings, signals
    Bicycle and pedestrian modeling
    NACTO/AASHTO/MUTCD coordination
    ADA and bicycle design
    Funding opportunities
    One-on-one engineering consultations on bicycle design

Daily field tours will explore Portland’s “living laboratory” of bicycle and pedestrian facilities to provide first-hand experience of design and operations of facilities and projects discussed in the classroom. There is nothing like actually seeing and riding on a variety of bicycle facility types to facilitate your understanding of their operations and make it easier for you to describe to colleagues and stakeholders back home. Students must be able to bike up to 10 miles a day, and expect mild elevation. Week-long bike rentals are available for an additional fee. Please request the bike rental when registering for the workshop.

Our course faculty provides access to some of the nation’s best expertise built up over a 20-year timeframe. Our instructors work together to present and explain issues from different angles.

Who Should Attend: Transportation engineers, urban planners, citizen experts, past participants of the IBPI week-long class and others interested in in-depth engineering and planning examples of bikeway design and innovation.  This class best serves people from communities who already have a developed bicycle network, municipal staff continuing to work on implementing bicycle facilities and are looking to move their community into the next phase of bicycle friendliness. This class will focus on in-depth problem solving on difficult planning and engineering issues.

Registration: The fee for this professional development course is $995. This includes continental breakfast, snacks, lunch, and course materials. The fee does not include travel, lodging or other meals while in Portland.

Registration is currently not open yet. If you'd like to be notified of registration opening, subscribe to the IBPI list.

Continuing Education Credits: This 5-day workshop will provide approximately 32 hours of training which equals to 32 CMs or 32 PDHs. IBPI applies to the AICP for Certification Maintenance credit for each webinar. We will provide an attendance certificate to those who document their professional development hours.
 
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Comprehensive Bicycle Design & Engineering 2.0

Symposium Celebrating 50 Years of Traffic Flow Theory

August 11, 2014 7:59 am - August 13, 2014 4:59 pm

Where: David Evans and Associates, 2100 SW River Parkway Portland, OR 97201

Summary: The Transportation Research Board (TRB) Committee on Traffic Flow Theory and Characteristics is pleased to announce the Symposium Celebrating 50 Years of Traffic Flow Theory and Midyear Meeting to be held in Portland, Oregon, USA, August 11-13, 2014. The predecessor committee focusing on traffic flow theory was organized 50 years ago, and this is an appropriate time to recognize the past accomplishments in the field, reflect on the present state of our research community and identify key future directions. Papers on all topics in the traffic flow theory and characteristics domains are welcome. We will be presenting exciting technical and social programs. We sincerely hope you will join us!

Organizing Committee Chair: Robert Bertini, Portland State University. Robert Bertini is a professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Portland State University. From 2009-2011, he served as Deputy Administrator of the Research and Innovative Technology Administration at the U.S. Department of Transportation, and from 2011-2012 he was a visiting professor at the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. A registered professional engineer in Oregon and California, Bertini's experience includes work with local government, several national transportation consulting firms and the auto industry.

Click here to register. Early registration is open now!

Symposium Celebrating 50 Years of Traffic Flow Theory

July 2014


Comprehensive Bicycle Design & Engineering 1.0

July 28, 2014 8:00 am - August 1, 2014 5:00 pm

Comprehensive Bicycle Design & Engineering 1.0
Where: Room 315 (ITS Lab), Engineering Building, Portland State University
Course Faculty: Mia Birk, Alta Planning + Design; Peter Koonce, Portland Bureau of Transportation; and other instructors TBA
Summary: The field of bikeway planning is rapidly evolving. This Initiative for Bicycle and Pedestrian Innovation (IBPI) course will cover the fundamentals of bikeway planning and design through an intensive week of interactive classroom and field experience. It will bring you up to speed on the cutting edge in practice and research and offer valuable skills for your professional life. Instructors will integrate transit access and connections, bridges, trail crossings, and other special features into discussions, while using project examples to highlight practical applications of the principles and techniques covered. Effective education and encouragement programs, including public involvement strategies, will also be discussed.

Topics will include:

    Bicycle and pedestrian master planning
    Bicycle facility design of intersections, crossings, and signals
    Trail design
    Bicycle boulevards
    Data collection
    Bicycle and pedestrian-friendly policy
    Funding opportunities
    Encouragement, education, and enforcement

Daily field tours will explore Portland’s “living laboratory” of bicycle facilities to provide first-hand experience of design and operations of facilities and projects discussed in the classroom. There is nothing like actually seeing and riding on a variety of bicycle facility types to facilitate your understanding of their operations and make it easier for you to describe to colleagues and stakeholders back home. Students must be able to bike up to 10 miles a day, and expect mild elevation. Week-long bike rentals are available for an additional fee. Please request the bike rental when registering for the workshop.

Our course faculty provides access to some of the nation’s best expertise built up over a 20-year timeframe. Our instructors work together to present and explain issues from different angles.

Who Should Attend: Urban planners and transportation engineers, policy makers, advocates and others interested in a broad overview of bicycle design, programs, policy and funding. This class best serves people from communities who are working to develop or implement their first major bicycle master plan. This class has more of a planning focus than in-depth engineering issues.

Registration: The fee for this professional development course is $995. This includes continental breakfast, snacks, lunch, and course materials. The fee does not include travel, lodging or other meals while in Portland.

Registration is currently not open yet. If you'd like to be notified of registration opening, subscribe to the IBPI list.

Continuing Education Credits: This 5-day workshop will provide approximately 32 hours of training which equals to 32 CMs or 32 PDHs. IBPI applies to the AICP for Certification Maintenance credit for each webinar. We will provide an attendance certificate to those who document their professional development hours.
 
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Comprehensive Bicycle Design & Engineering 1.0

Health Impact Assessment (HIA) in Transportation Planning

July 16, 2014 10:00 am - July 16, 2014 11:15 am

Health Impact Assessment (HIA) in Transportation Planning: What to Expect From Planning and Public Health Stakeholders

Free IBPI Webinar
Wednesday, July 16, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:15 AM PST
Instructor: Nicole Iroz-Elardo, Oregon Health Authority, Public Health Division

 

Health impact assessment (HIA) has emerged in the U.S. as a promising way to increase social and environmental justice by addressing health equity within transportation planning.  HIA seeks to augment the information base upon which public decisions are made.  It does so through a multi-disciplinary analysis of how the project or plan impacts various social determinants of health.  It also augments community and stakeholder engagement by providing a forum - usually through an advisory committee - where stakeholders can identify and deliberate about health interests related to the target plan.  While HIA advisory committees are diverse by design, those managing HIA processes are often surprised at the differences between and within both the planning and transportation fields. 

This webinar reviews stakeholder engagement strategies common to HIA.  It compares and contrasts the values, expectations, and methodologies that various types of planning and public health professionals often bring to the table.  Finally, it identifies best practices for stakeholder engagement in HIA to maximize the collaborative nature of HIA.

Continuing Education Credits: This 60-minute webinar provides one hour of training which equals 1 CM or 1 PDH. IBPI applies to the AICP for Certification Maintenance credit for each webinar. We will provide an attendance certificate to those who document their professional development hours.

Configuration: The webinar will be administered through GoToWebinar. The room will be opened 30 minutes before the start of the webinar.

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June 2014


PSU Delft Summer Program

June 28, 2014 8:00 am - July 11, 2014 5:00 pm

Sustainable Transportation in the Netherlands

Faculty: Dr. Robert Bertini (PSU), Dr. Peter Furth (NEU) 


Summary: This popular course offers students a unique learning opportunity. Open to PSU seniors and graduate students from all majors, students immerse themselves in the Netherlands and experience firsthand how pedestrian, bicycle, transit and auto modes can work together and complement each other in a truly liveable way.

Peter Koonce (The City of Portland Bureau of Transportation), the course's original creator, was inspired to develop the curriculum after guest lecturing for a Northeastern University course hosted at TU Delft in 2010. Koonce soon realized that he was involved in a course that he should have taken as an undergraduate, and he pledged to create the same experience for students at PSU.

"At the City of Portland, we had been talking about building better bicycle facilities, but it was hard to imagine them. By visiting with Dutch traffic engineers, you could ask them specific questions on what was working for them and how their design philosophies evolved over time."
Topics include Dutch bicycle facility planning and design, roundabout design, bicycle highways, transit networks, land use and zoning impact on transportation planning, and transit oriented development. In a typical day students meet for an introductory lecture at TU Delft, cycle to a nearby city for a tour led by local planners, engineers and politicians. Students work in small groups on a wiki-based project and also blog about their experiences as part of the course.

A recent article about the course, which recounts the insights and experiences of some former course participants, can be found here.

CE 4/510 (5 credits)
Faculty: Dr. Robert Bertini (PSU), Dr. Peter Furth (NEU)

More information about the course can be found here or by completing this simple form. Non-students interested in participating in the course should contact Dr. Robert Bertini.

Applications are now available through PSU Education Abroad.
 

PSU Delft Summer Program

Health and Transportation Partners: Working to Improve Pedestrian Safety in Oregon

June 11, 2014 11:00 am - June 11, 2014 2:30 pm

Health and Transportation Partners: Working to Improve Pedestrian Safety in Oregon

Safe States Pedestrian Injury Prevention Training and Mini-Grant Opportunity 

Free IBPI Webinar
Wednesday, June 11, 2014
Part 1: 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM PST
Part 2: 1:00 PM -  2:30 PM PST

Join health and transportation partners working in Oregon and learn a variety of ways to improve pedestrian safety in your neighborhood, town or city. Explore the links between health and transportation, the best practices being used to increase the numbers of individuals using active transportation, and how to keep all road users safer. These methods need not necessarily be expensive engineering solutions, but can encompass education, enforcement and some simple fixes.

This webinar is required viewing for taking advantage of a pedestrian safety mini-grant opportunity that will be released in June 2014. Click here to preview the mini-grant program guidelines and application. The webinar will be recorded and a link will be emailed to all registrants after the webinar.

Audience: Those working in public health, pedestrian or bicycle advocacy, law enforcement, community planning, traffic engineering, citizen engagement or other fields that want to get people using active transportation and reduce the risks to users of the system.

Continuing Education Credits: This webinar provides three hours of training which equals 3 CM or 3 PDH. IBPI applies to the AICP for Certification Maintenance credit for each webinar. We will provide an attendance certificate to those who document their professional development hours.

Configuration: The webinar will be administered through GoToWebinar. The room will be opened 30 minutes before the start of the webinar.

Add this 2-part event to your calendar:

Morning

Afternoon

Health and Transportation Partners: Working to Improve Pedestrian Safety in Oregon

E-Bikes: Generating the New Wave of Cyclists

June 9, 2014 10:00 am - June 9, 2014 11:15 am

E-Bikes: Generating the New Wave of Cyclists

Free IBPI Webinar
Monday, June 9, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:15 AM PST
Instructor: John MacArthur, Sustainable Transportation Program Manager, Oregon Transportation Research and Education Consortium

 

How do we get more people biking and to bike more often? Communities around North America are struggling with this question as they face growing economic, social, health and environmental issues. This webinar aims to explore if adding technology to bicycles can reduce barriers to bicycling (e.g.,  trip distance, topography, time, and rider effort) and encourage more bicycling trips, longer bicycling trips, and increase the diversity of people bicycling, including people with a disability or chronic injury. 

Electric bicycles (e-bikes) are well established in China and other Asian and European countries but market adoption has been slow in the United States.  E-bikes typically resemble a standard pedal bicycle with the addition of a rechargeable battery and electric motor to assist the rider with propulsion. Though research on the economic, operational, and safety issues of e-bikes in North America is limited, the webinar will present information gathered by PSU researchers on the adoption of e-bikes. Results from an online survey of existing e-bike users on their purchase and use decisions will be presented, which suggest that e-bikes are enabling users to bike more often, to more distant locations, and to carry more cargo with them. Additionally, e-bikes seem to allow people who would otherwise not be able to bike, because of physical limitations or proximity to locations, the ability to bike with electric assist.

What is an e-bike? Who is using these bikes and why? What are the barriers that are preventing broader adoption of this technology?  As adoption of e-bikes increases, how should local agencies address the integration of e-bikes with other modes? These questions and more will be explored in this webinar.

The webinar is free through registration; early registration is encouraged. An archived video will also be posted after the webinar. 

Continuing Education Credits: This 60-minute webinar provides one hour of training which equals 1 CM or 1 PDH. IBPI applies to the AICP for Certification Maintenance credit for each webinar. We will provide an attendance certificate to those who document their professional development hours.

Configuration: The webinar will be administered through GoToWebinar. The room will be opened 30 minutes before the start of the webinar.

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E-Bikes: Generating the New Wave of Cyclists

Seminar #394: Transforming Transportation Through Connectivity

June 6, 2014 12:00 pm - June 6, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Robert Bertini, Professor, Portland State University
Topic: Seminar #394: Transforming Transportation Through Connectivity
Summary: The transportation system is the backbone of the United States' economy, and transportation is an essential part of everyday life for American citizens. It is essential that the transportation system continue to provide accessibility and connectivity to an ever-evolving global economy. A key way to do so is to embrace, develop and implement new technologies. One of the newest and most promising facets of transportation-related technology is in the field of connected mobility. The vision behind connected mobility is of a transportation system where vehicles, travelers, and infrastructure are all wirelessly connected with one another and able to transmit real-time data about things like weather, location, and vehicle and infrastructure status. Such a degree of connectivity could have substantial benefits for the safety, mobility, and sustainability of the domestic transportation system, including accident prevention and congestion reduction. In recent years, major strides have been made into the research and development of connected mobility technology and some field-testing has commenced, but there is a need for more attention and investment from stakeholders throughout the transportation community and beyond. 
 
Watch an archived video through the link here.
 
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Seminar #394: Transforming Transportation Through Connectivity

May 2014


GIS Tools for Bicycle Network Analysis and Planning

May 30, 2014 12:00 pm - May 30, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Mike Lowry, Professor, University of Idaho
Topic: GIS Tools for Bicycle Network Analysis and Planning
Summary: This presentation is a showcase of various GIS tools developed for bicycle network analysis and planning. The showcase includes a tool for assessing community-wide bikeability, a tool for forecasting bicycle volumes based on street topology, and a tool for evaluating different bicycle improvement plans in terms of exposure to danger situations for bicyclists. The tools will be demonstrated with case study data. The presentation will include a review of the Highway Capacity Manual Bicycle Level of Service and a discussion about using bicycle and pedestrian data collected through citizen-volunteer count programs.

Stream
the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.

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GIS Tools for Bicycle Network Analysis and Planning

Capturing the Ride: Exploring Low-Density Flexible Transit Alternatives in Salem-Keizer

May 23, 2014 12:00 pm - May 23, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204, Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Darwin Moosavi, MURP, Portland State University
Topic: Capturing the Ride: Exploring Low-Density Flexible Transit Alternatives in Salem-Keizer
Summary: Current fixed-route transit service provided by Salem-Keizer Transit is inefficient in the low-density neighborhoods of West Salem, South Salem, and Keizer. The lack of sidewalks, non-gridded circuitous streets, and large single-family residential lots all contribute to a lack of ridership. As a result, traditional fixed-route transit service is not cost-effective in these areas.  Through a five month planning process, a group of Portland State University graduate students, better known as Paradigm Planning, tackled the task of addressing this problem in each of the three study areas. Paradigm’s planning process explored mode and route options in order to produce a plan that provides innovative and feasible alternatives to current transit service that will better meet the needs of the community. Through an intensive community engagement process, the residents in each neighborhood were given a voice in shaping the future of transit in their neighborhood.
 
Stream the seminar live, or watch an archived video through the link here.
 
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Capturing the Ride: Exploring Low-Density Flexible Transit Alternatives in Salem-Keizer

Just Sustainabilities: Re-Imagining E/quality, Living Within Limits

May 21, 2014 7:00 pm - May 21, 2014 9:00 pm

Where: Native American Student and Community Center, 710 SW Jackson Street, Portland, OR 97201
Speaker: Julian Agyeman, PhD
Topic: Just Sustainabilities: Re-Imagining E/quality, Living Within Limits

Summary: Professor Agyeman will first outline the concept of ‘just sustainabilities.’ He will argue that integrating social needs and welfare offers us a more ‘just,’ rounded, and equity-focused definition of sustainability and sustainable development, while not negating the very real environmental threats we face. He will define just sustainabilities as ‘the need to ensure a better quality of life for all, now and into the future, in a just and equitable manner, whilst living within the limits of supporting ecosystems.’ He will then look at examples of just sustainabilities in practice in the real world focusing on ideas about ‘fair shares’ resource distribution globally; planning for intercultural cities; achieving wellbeing and happiness; the potential in the new sharing economy; and finally the concept of ‘spatial justice’ and how it complements the more established concept of social justice.

Julian Agyeman is Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning at Tufts University, Medford, MA. He is an environmental social scientist whose expertise and current research interests are in the complex and embedded relations between humans and the environment, whether mediated by governmental institutions or social movements, and the effects of this on public policy and planning processes and outcomes, particularly in relation to notions of justice and equity. He is co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of the international journal ‘Local Environment: The International Journal of Justice and Sustainability.’ With over 150 publications, his recent books include ‘Cultivating Food Justice: Race, Class and Sustainability’ (MIT Press 2011) and ‘Introducing Just Sustainabilities: Policy, Planning and Practice’ (Zed Books 2013). In August 2014, his book ‘Incomplete Streets: Processes, Practices and Possibilities’ will be launched by Routledge.

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Just Sustainabilities: Re-Imagining E/quality, Living Within Limits

Of Railroads & Finance:  The Making of Market Society in the Pacific Northwest

May 16, 2014 3:00 pm - May 16, 2014 4:30 pm

Where: Cramer Hall 250 at PSU
Speaker: Mitch Green
Topic: Of Railroads & Finance:  The Making of Market Society in the Pacific Northwest

Summary:
 
Mitch Green was an honors economics student at PSU and is currently finishing a Ph.D. at UMKC. Join us for his seminar presentation "Of Railroads & Finance:  The Making of Market Society in the Pacific Northwest"
 
Economic systems are peculiar to time and place. They are embedded within an institutional fabric. Consequently, it is appropriate to think of them in the general sense as systems of social provisioning. Mitch Green is interested in how the provisioning process in the Pacific Northwest undergoes qualitative change with the rise of market-based activity. More specifically, he examines how the development of the railroads in the region established enduring ties with financiers on the East coast and Europe, and how these ties facilitated the exercise of power for certain individuals central in their respective social networks. These men of railroads and finance acted in an institutional capacity to transform the region we now understand as the Pacific Northwest so that it was conducive to the generation of financial flows in the machine age. In doing so, they set in motion a process of cumulative development that would render the old provisioning process unviable. That is, the non-market provisioning process embedded in the complex of tribal social relations was destroyed and the peoples who flourished within it were displaced. However, the two systems shared a common thread: each bore some direct relationship with the Columbia River Basin. Hence, Green uses the river as his entry point in a framework of analysis that seeks to trace out the many relations that account for such radical change. 
 
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Pedestrian Safety and Culture Change

May 16, 2014 12:00 pm - May 16, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204, Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Ron Van Houten, Western Michigan University
Topic: Pedestrian Safety and Culture Change
Summary: This session will describe the process and results of a NHTSA study that showed a change in driver culture of yielding to pedestrians in crosswalks on a citywide basis. The research won the Pat Waller award from the National Academy of Sciences, Transportation Research Board in January of this year. The approach to changing road user behavior focused on an integrated approach that include Enforcement, Engineering, and Educational efforts that were designed to be dovetailed together and that included a social norming component. Additional information will be provided on engineering solutions that can facilitate changes in pedestrian level of service and safety.

Stream the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.
 
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Pedestrian Safety and Culture Change

Analytical Efficiencies Through the Integration of Modeling and Simulation Tools

May 9, 2014 12:00 pm - May 9, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Steve Perone, PTV Group
Topic: Analytical efficiencies through the integration of modeling and simulation tools
Summary: Linking planning and operations is vital to improving transportation decision making and the overall effectiveness of transportation systems. In this seminar Steve will discuss data and modeling methods supported by the PTV Vision software suite to facilitate integrated planning for operations.

Stream the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.

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Analytical Efficiencies Through the Integration of Modeling and Simulation Tools

Highlights from the Green Lane: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Protected Cycling Facilities

May 2, 2014 12:00 pm - May 2, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Chris Monsere and Jennifer Dill, Professors, Portland State University
Topic: Highlights from the Green Lane: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Protected Cycling Facilities
Summary: Cycling is on the rise across the U.S. and its popularity has grown beyond the usual leaders - Portland, OR, Seattle, WA, Davis, CA, Minneapolis, MN and Boulder, CO. New York City, NY Chicago, IL and Washington, DC are among those cities making significant investments in bike infrastructure in recent years and have realized substantial growth in people taking to the streets on two wheels. This presentation will summarize some results from our comprehensive assessment of the safety, operations, economic impacts, user experience, and perceptions of new protected bikeways in 5 cities U.S. cities (Austin, TX; Chicago, IL; Portland, OR; San Francisco, CA; and Washington, D.C.). To support this research, the team collected and analyzed 204 hours of video, 2,300 returned surveys of residents, and 1,111 returned surveys from people intercepted riding the new facilities.

*image by Greg Raisman

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the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.

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Highlights from the Green Lane: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Protected Cycling Facilities

April 2014


Assessing Impacts of Time Use on Children’s Physical Fitness in Relation to Obesity & Diabetes Risk

April 25, 2014 12:00 pm - April 25, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Jessica Guo, Supervising Planner, Parsons Brinckerhoff
Topic: Assessing Impacts of Time Use on Children's Physical Fitness in Relation to Risk for Obesity and Diabetes
Summary: Researchers from the transportation, planning and health fields share the common goal of promoting physically active lifestyle. One challenge that researchers often face is the measurement of physical activity, particularly among children. This is because the sporadic nature of children’s physical activity patterns makes it difficult to recall and quantify such activities. Additionally, children’s lower cognitive functioning compared to adults prevents them from accurately recalling their activities. This presentation will describe the design and application of a novel self-report instrument - the Graphs for Recalling Activity Time (GReAT) - for measuring children’s activity time use patterns. The instrument was applied in a study of children’s risk for obesity and diabetes in a predominately Hispanic community in Milwaukee, WI. Time-use data for two weekdays and one weekend day were collected for various physical and sedentary activities. The data was then assessed against measurements of the children’s cardiovascular fitness, weight status and insulin resistance through exploratory analysis and structured equation modeling. Findings on GReAT’s reliability and new evidence on the impacts of time-use in different activities on children’s risk for obesity and diabetes will be discussed.

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the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.

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Assessing Impacts of Time Use on Children’s Physical Fitness in Relation to Obesity & Diabetes Risk

Transportation and Road Weather

April 18, 2014 12:00 pm - April 18, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Rhonda Young, University of Wyoming
Topic: Transportation and Road Weather
Summary: Weather has a tremendous impact on the transportation system and is one of the largest contributors to non-recurring delay and increased crashes.  Road weather is the a multidisciplinary area involving transportation engineers and meteorologists who are working to mitigate the negative effects of weather on the operation and maintenance practices of transportation systems.  The talk covers the broad types of issues being studied in this field and looks at ways in which technology is playing a large part in the proposed solutions.  The issue of weather as a complicating factor in the use of connected and autonomous vehicle technologies  is also discussed.

*Image by Derek Bridges

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the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.
 
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Transportation and Road Weather

Transit Planning Practice in the Age of Transit-Oriented Development

April 11, 2014 12:00 pm - April 11, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204, Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Ian Carlton, UC Berkeley
Topic: Transit Planning Practice in the Age of Transit-Oriented Development
Summary: Transit serves as backbone infrastructure for many regional and local visions for sustainable urban development. Also, many modern policies predicate transit funding on the potential for transit-oriented development (TOD) near proposed infrastructure investments. However, little research has examined how TOD considerations have informed transit planning. This presentation discusses the results of recent dissertation research that fills this gap. Through multiple transit project case studies and interviews with nearly 100 transit planning professionals, this research categorized how transit projects across 19 U.S. regions were designed to foster TOD and how transit planning professionals identified TOD opportunities as projects were planned. During interviews, many professionals lamented the amount of real estate development that had occurred around the transit projects they helped plan. Analysis revealed that the ways in which professionals identified TOD opportunities helped to explain disconnects between their expectations and actual outcomes. The findings raise concerns about the effectiveness and efficiency of transit planning practice in the age of transit-oriented development and point to potential policy and practice changes that could address the issues.
 
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Transit Planning Practice in the Age of Transit-Oriented Development

An Introduction to the NACTO Urban Street Design - Changing the DNA of City Streets

April 4, 2014 12:00 pm - April 4, 2014 10:37 am

Where: Room 204, Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Peter Koonce, Portland Bureau of Transportation
Topic: An Introduction to the NACTO Urban Street Design - Changing the DNA of City Streets
Summary: Peter Koonce, P.E., manages the traffic signals and street lighting for the City of Portland. He will summarize his contributions to the NACTO Urban Street Design Guide, a guidebook focused on a paradigm shift in transportation, pulling away from the traditional bias toward highway designs that do not always meet the complex needs of streets in cities.
 
Stream the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.
 
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An Introduction to the NACTO Urban Street Design  - Changing the DNA of City Streets

March 2014


Federal Transit Administration’s Impact on Public Transportation in the U.S.

March 14, 2014 12:00 pm - March 14, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Amy Changchien, Federal Transit Administration
Topic: Federal Transit Administration's Impact on Public Transportation in the U.S.
Summary: The Federal Transit Administration invests in building the capacity and improving the quality of public transportation throughout the United States of America.  Under FTA's leadership, public rail, bus, trolley, ferry, and other transit services have reached greater levels of safety, reliability, availability, and accessibility.  Come hear the highlights of FTA's impacts and participate in an interactive question/answer session and discussion on career options in public transportation!

*image courtesty of Steve Morgan

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Federal Transit Administration’s Impact on Public Transportation in the U.S.

10 Tips to Tell Your Story in a Thought-Provoking and Technically Truthful Way

March 7, 2014 12:00 pm - March 7, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Dave Thompson, Oregon DOT
Topic: 10 Tips to Tell Your Story in a Thought-Provoking and Technically Truthful Way
Summary: How do you explain complex ideas? What do you say when reporters ask you to guess about the future? ODOT spokesperson and public affairs manager Dave Thompson will share tips on how to explain a complex topic to reporters and concerned citizens. Thompson worked as a broadcast news reporter, producer and anchor for 20 years, including anchoring the weekend news at KPTV from 1992 to 2000. He’s been in public relations another 14 years, leading pre-IPO angel-invested startup branding efforts and providing company and government agency perspective to reporters and citizens. And of course, apologizing for Portland’s congestion and warning us about driving in snowstorms. But Dave didn’t start out in communications: He was a math major! His message: With practice, you can and should speak in public, if you’re prepared and when you’re the subject matter expert. (If he can do it, you can do it!) Dave will show you how to engage your audience’s imagination to explain the complex, yet stay true to the technical.

Stream the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.
 
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10 Tips to Tell Your Story in a Thought-Provoking and Technically Truthful Way

The Tea Party, Agenda 21 and Sustainable Transportation Planning

March 4, 2014 12:00 pm - March 4, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: PSU Urban Center Gallery, 2nd Floor
Speaker: Dr. Karen Trapenberg Frick, PhD
Topic: The Tea Party, Agenda 21 and Sustainable Transportation Planning

Dr. Karen Trapenberg Frick is Assistant Director of University of California Transportation Center. She also is a lecturer in the Department of City and Regional Planning and teaches graduate and undergraduate classes in transportation policy and planning, and she was the academic lead for CED's [IN]CITY summer program in sustainable city planning. She holds a Ph.D. in city planning from UC Berkeley and a masters in planning from UCLA.

Dr. Frick is an expert on sustainable transport and community development policies and strategies as well as major transportation infrastructure projects. Her current research includes an evaluation of variable tolls on the Bay Bridge and an investigation of best practices and challenges related to transport innovations.

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The Tea Party, Agenda 21 and Sustainable Transportation Planning

February 2014


Measuring urban bicyclists’ uptake of traffic-related pollution

February 28, 2014 12:00 pm - February 28, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Alex Bigazzi, PhD candidate, Portland State University
Topic: Measuring urban bicyclists’ uptake of traffic-related pollution
Summary: Urban bicyclists’ uptake of traffic-related air pollution is still not well quantified, due to a lack of direct measurements of uptake and a lack of analysis of the variation in uptake. This paper describes and establishes the feasibility of a novel method for measuring bicyclists’ uptake of volatile organic compounds (VOC) by sampling breath concentrations. Early results from the data set demonstrate the ability of the proposed method to generate findings for transportation analysis, with statistically significant exposure and uptake differences from bicycling on arterial versus bikeway facilities for several traffic-related VOC. These results provide the first empirical evidence that the usage of bikeways (or greenways) by bicyclists within an urban environment can significantly reduce uptake of dangerous traffic-related gas pollutants. Dynamic concentration and respiration data reveal unfavorable correlations from a health impacts perspective, where bicyclists’ respiration and travel time are greater at higher-concentration locations on already high-concentration roadways (arterials).

*Image by Greg Raisman

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Measuring urban bicyclists’ uptake of traffic-related pollution

We are Traffic: Creating Robust Bicycle and Pedestrian Count Programs

February 27, 2014 10:00 am - February 27, 2014 11:15 am

We are Traffic: Creating Robust Bicycle and Pedestrian Count Programs
Free IBPI webinar
Instructor: Krista Nordback, Ph.D
Summary: As agencies looking to improve bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure have learned, it doesn’t count if it’s not counted. Counting provides information on the level of intersections, paths and roadways—data already available for motor vehicles but lacking for non-motorized travelers. For the first time, Federal Highway Administration’s Traffic Monitoring Guide now includes a chapter detailing how to monitor bicycle and pedestrian traffic. This webinar explains how to create a robust bicycle and pedestrian count program based on the new guidance. Agencies that show clear evidence of use are more likely to receive funding for projects, so join us and learn how to improve your existing count program or create a new one.

Join us for our inaugural webinar. The webinar is free and open to the public. Registration is required before the start of the webinar in order for us to be able to send you an entry link. Registration is currently open and available until the day of the webinar or until capacity is reached.

Continuing Education Credits: This 60-minute webinar provides one hour of training which equals to 1 CM or 1 PDH. IBPI applies to the AICP for Certification Maintenance credit for each webinar. We will provide an attendance certificate to those who document their professional development hours.

Configuration: The webinar will be administered through Blackboard Collaborate. Please check that your computer meets the system requirement and to download the software in advance by clicking here. You may also complete this step before the start of the webinar. The room will be opened 30 minutes before the start of the webinar.

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We are Traffic: Creating Robust Bicycle and Pedestrian Count Programs

Bike Planning Methods in Oregon Communities

February 21, 2014 12:00 pm - February 21, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Tara Weidner, Oregon DOT
Topic: Bike Planning Methods in Oregon Communities
Summary: In this seminar, Tara Weidner will discuss changes in the works to the State Analysis Procedures Manual (APM) to include three graduated levels of bike planning methods for use in Oregon communities, based on community size, data needs, and planning stage.  These include the Bike Level of Traffic Stress (BLTS), a sketch tool used to assess bike network connectivity, the data-heavy Highway Capacity Manual Multi-modal Level of Service (MMLOS) procedures, and a simplified MMLOS developed by the same researchers. 
 
Stream the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.

*Image by Greg Raisman.
 
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Bike Planning Methods in Oregon Communities

A Recipe for an Online, Geospatial Transit Performance Archive

February 14, 2014 12:00 pm - February 14, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Jon Makler, Portland State University
Topic: A Recipe for an Online, Geospatial Transit Performance Archive
Summary: Where and when does overcrowding happen on TriMet's bus network? Which routes have the best on-time performance? Portland State University and TriMet have collaborated to make this kind of data available to anybody through Portal, PSU's transportation data archive for the Portland/Vancouver region. This presentation will cover the use of General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS) data for mapping TriMet’s performance data and the development of Portal’s innovative transit application. In the MAP-21 era of performance management, see how tools like Portal can support enhanced agency decision-making as well as community engagement.
 
Stream the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.
 
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A Recipe for an Online, Geospatial Transit Performance Archive

The Most Important 18% - Commute trips from the US Census

February 7, 2014 12:00 pm - February 7, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Penelope Z. Weinberger, AASHTO
Topic: The Most Important 18% - Commute trips from the US Census, and while we're looking, what else happens to be in there?
Summary: The Census Transportation Products Program (CTPP) commissions a special tabulation of interest to transportation practitioners. This seminar will talk about the CTPP and how to access the data, technical assistance, and research available through the program.

Stream the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.
 
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The Most Important 18% - Commute trips from the US Census

January 2014


Regional Planning, Greenhouse Gases, and UrbanFootprint open source software

January 31, 2014 12:00 pm - January 31, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Garlynn Woodsong, Project Manager, Calthorpe Associates
Topic: Regional Planning, Greenhouse Gases, and UrbanFootprint open source software.
Summary: Since about 2008, the planning world has been experiencing a paradigm shift that began in places like California and Oregon that have adopted legislation requiring the linking of land use and transportation plans to outcomes, specifically to the reduction of greenhouse gases (GHGs). In response to this need, Calthorpe Associates has developed a new planning tool, called UrbanFootprint, on a fully Open Source platform (i.e. Ubuntu Linux, PostGIS, PostGreSQL, etc.). As a powerful and dynamic web and mobile-enabled geo-spatial scenario creation and modeling tool with full co-benefits analysis capacity, UrbanFootprint has great utility for urban planning and research at multiple scales, from general plans, to project assessments, to regional and state-wide scenario development and analysis. Scenario outcomes measurement modules include: a powerful ‘sketch’ transportation model that produces travel and emissions impacts; a public health analysis engine that measures land use impacts on respiratory disease, obesity, and related impacts and costs; climate-sensitive building energy and water modeling; fiscal impacts analysis; and greenhouse gas and other emissions modeling.

Stream the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.
 
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Regional Planning, Greenhouse Gases, and UrbanFootprint open source software

Modeling Injury Outcomes of Crashes involving Heavy Vehicles on Texas Highways

January 24, 2014 12:00 pm - January 24, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Salvador Hernandez, Oregon State University
Topic: Modeling Injury Outcomes of Crashes involving Heavy Vehicles on Texas Highways
Summary: A growing concern related to large-truck crashes has increased in the State of Texas in recent years due to the potential economic impacts and level of injury severity that can be sustained. Yet, studies on large truck involved crashes highlighting the contributing factors leading to injury severity have not been conducted in detail in the State of Texas especially for its interstate system.  In this study, we analyze the contributing factors related to injury severity by utilizing Texas crash data based on a discrete outcome based model which accounts for possible unobserved heterogeneity related to human, vehicle and road-environment. We estimate a random parameter logit model (i.e., mixed logit) to predict the likelihood of five standard injury severity scales commonly used in Crash Records Information System (CRIS) in Texas – fatal, incapacitating, non-incapacitating, possible, and no injury (property damage only). Estimation findings indicate that the level of injury severity outcomes is highly influenced by a number of complex interactions between factors and the effects of the some factors can vary across observations. The contributing factors include drivers’ demographics, traffic flow condition, roadway geometrics, land use and temporal characteristics, weather, and lighting conditions.

Stream the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.

Image by JP Fagerback
 
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Modeling Injury Outcomes of Crashes involving Heavy Vehicles on Texas Highways

TRB Highlights: 3 PSU Student Presentations

January 17, 2014 12:00 pm - January 17, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Katherine E. Bell, Adam Moore and Liang Ma, Portland State University
Topic: TRB Highlights: 3 PSU Student Presentations
Summaries: Identification and Characterization of PM2.5 and VOC Hot Spots on Arterial Corridor by Integrating Probe Vehicle, Traffic, and Land Use Data The purpose of this study is to explore the use of integrated probe vehicle, traffic and land use data to identify and characterize fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and volatile organic compound (VOC) hot spot locations on urban arterial corridors. An emission hot spot is defined as a fixed location along a corridor in which the mean pollutant concentrations are consistently above the 85th percentile of pollutant concentrations when considering all other locations along the corridor during the same time period. In order to collect data for this study, an electric vehicle was equipped with instruments designed to measure PM2.5 and VOC concentrations. Second-by-second measurements were performed for each pollutant from both the right and left sides of the vehicle. Detailed meteorological, traffic and land use data is also available for this research. The results of a statistical analysis are used to better understand which data sources are most valuable in estimating PM2.5 and VOC hot spot locations consistent with empirical data, as well as which variables have the greatest impact on emissions and pollutant levels at a microscale level. This research highlights the importance of considering both consistency and peak emission levels when identifying hot spot locations. An objective of this research is to develop a method to identify urban arterial hot spot locations that provides a balance of efficiency (in terms of capital expenses, time, resources, expertise requirements, etc.) and accuracy.

Modeling Impact of Traffic Conditions on Variability of Midblock Roadside Fine Particulate Matter Concentrations on an Urban Arterial This paper presents an innovative modeling of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations as a function of very high resolution meteorological and traffic data. Peak period measurements were taken at a mid-block roadside location on an urban arterial commuter roadway. To capture the impact of dynamic traffic conditions, data were analyzed at 10-second intervals, with substantially higher resolution than typical roadside air quality study designs. Particular attention was paid to changes in traffic conditions, including fleet mix, queuing and vehicle platooning over the course of the study period, and the effect of these changes on PM2.5. Significant correlations were observed between vehicle platoons and increases in PM2.5 concentrations. Traffic state analysis was employed to determine median PM2.5 levels before and after the onset of congestion. A multivariate regression model was estimated to determine significant PM2.5 predictors while controlling for autocorrelation. Significance was found not only in the simultaneous traffic variables but also in lagged traffic variables; additionally, the effects of vehicle types and wind direction were quantified. Modeling results indicate that traffic conditions and vehicle type do have a significant impact on roadside PM2.5 concentrations. For instance, the addition of one heavy vehicle was shown to increase PM2.5 concentrations by 2.45% when wind blew across the roadway before reaching the monitoring location. This study serves as a demonstration of the abilities of very high resolution data to identify the effects of relatively minute changes in traffic conditions on air pollutant concentrations.

Effects of the Objective and Perceived Built Environment on Bicycling for Transportation This paper investigates the relative effects of the objectively-measured built environment versus stated perceptions of the built-environment on bicycling. Data are from a random phone survey conducted in the Portland, Oregon region. Binary logit and linear regression models, using objective measures, perceived measures, and both sets of measures, were estimated to predict odds of bicycling and frequency of bicycling separately. Results showed that the perceived environment and objective environment had independent effects on bicycling. This suggests that future bicycling research should include both perceived and objective measures of the built environment when possible. In addition, it indicates that interventions that focus on changing perceptions of the environment may be as important as actual changes in the built environment. The objective environment was necessary but not sufficient for bicycling. Intervention programs to improve people’s perceptions of the environment may be necessary to reap the full potential of planning and design policies.  The results also suggest that it is useful to predict odds of bicycling and bicycling frequency separately, as the predictors of each behavior do vary. Finally, the analysis confirms the importance of attitudes in predicting behavior.

Stream the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.
 
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TRB Highlights: 3 PSU Student Presentations

Pedestrian Crossings, Bicycling and Transit Stop Removal: 3 TRB annual meeting student presentations

January 10, 2014 12:00 pm - January 10, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Nick Foster, Christopher Muhs and Zef Wagner, Portland State University
Topic: Pedestrian Crossings, Bicycling and Transit Stop Removal: 3 Transportation Research Board annual meeting student presentations
Summaries: Evaluating Driver and Pedestrian Behaviors at Enhanced Multilane Midblock Pedestrian Crossings: Case Study in Portland, Oregon This study examines driver and pedestrian behaviors at two enhanced midblock pedestrian crossings in Portland, Oregon. One crossing is on a five-lane arterial with a posted speed of 35/45 miles-per-hour (MPH) and features six rectangular rapid flash beacon (RRFB) assemblies and a narrow median refuge. The other crossing is on a suburban arterial with four travel lanes and a two-way left-turn lane. The crossing is enhanced with four RRFB assemblies and a median island with a “Z” crossing, or Danish offset, designed to encourage pedestrians to face oncoming traffic before completing the second stage of their crossing. Approximately 62 hours of video have been collected at the two locations. A total of 351 pedestrian crossings are analyzed for driver compliance (yielding) rates, pedestrian activation rates, pedestrian delay, and conflict avoidance maneuvers. The suburban arterial crossing is also evaluated to determine its effectiveness at diverting pedestrians to cross at it instead of away from a crosswalk, as well as pedestrian compliance with the Z-crossing. This study finds that average driver yield rates at both sites are just over 90% when the RRFB is activated, which is consistent with previous studies. RRFB actuation rates range from 83% to over 90%. The results also show that approximately 52% of all crossings at the marked crosswalk at the second location are from diverted pedestrians and that the enhanced crossing captures about 82% of all crossings near the crosswalk. Finally, approximately 52%, of the pedestrians using the crosswalk follow the Z-crossing pattern through the median.

Bicycling Is Different: Built Environment Relationships to Nonwork Travel There is growing investment in infrastructure to support non-motorized travel modes in the United States, in particular for bicycling. However, there remains a dearth of knowledge on the relationships between built environments and bicycling for non-work transportation. This issue is exacerbated by researchers and practitioners continuing to combine walking and bicycling into the category “non-motorized modes,” despite the two having many differences. This paper addresses these shortcomings through a segmented analysis of mode choice and mode share for walking, bicycling, and automobile travel. The data used are from a 2011 establishment intercept survey in the Portland, Oregon region and are destination-based. Results show pronounced differences in the empirical relationships between walking and bicycling and the built environment, when controlling for aspects of the individual, site, and trip. Models for mode choice and mode share indicate that the built environment attributes that influence automobile and walk travel are similar; yet, their influence is in the opposite direction. Empirical relationships with the built environment are altogether different for bicycling trips. Socio-demographic variable results are consistent with much of the non-work mode choice literature, but trip distance is not. Trip distance has the expected relationship with walking, but does not have a significant relationship with bicycling. The findings on the built environment relationships with travel modes support a move away from combining walking and bicycling together as non-motorized transportation for analysis and planning. They also lend insight into additional considerations for future work in non-work transportation research and policy.

Benefit-Cost Evaluation Method for Transit Stop Removal The introduction of wider stop spacing through the removal or consolidation of existing stops is one method transit agencies can use to reduce travel time and reliability on many transit lines. A great deal of research has been done to provide tools for determining optimal stop spacing, but tools are still needed to help service planners determine the optimal stops to remove. Stop-level bus performance data provide the information needed to develop a method for assessing the total benefits and costs to riders of removing individual stops. This tool compares the benefit to through-riders in terms of travel time savings with the additional access cost to riders using the stop. The tool was applied to a bus route in Portland, Oregon, using stop-level ridership data from TriMet, the regional transit agency. The case study identifies three stops with very high benefit-cost ratios and discusses the effects of removing those stops. A sensitivity analysis is performed to show the effect of changing the value of time factor or the assumed time savings from each stop removal. Further research needs are identified and tradeoffs are discussed regarding the use of this tool. Overall, the assessment tool provides a relatively simple way for transit service planners to identify ideal stops for removal or consolidation.

Stream the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.
 
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Pedestrian Crossings, Bicycling and Transit Stop Removal: 3 TRB annual meeting student presentations

December 2013


Peak Pedaling: Has Portland Bicycling reached the Top of the Logistic Curve?

December 6, 2013 12:00 pm - December 6, 2013 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Robert McCullough, McCullough Research
Topic: Peak Pedaling: Has Portland Bicycling reached the Top of the Logistic Curve?

Summary: The recent City Club report on bicycling provided an opportunity to collect and analyze a number of data sets including the new Hawthorne Bridge data. One question is where Portland bicycling is on the logistic curve -- a common tool used for judging the maturity of a developing product or activity. Logistic curves are used for marketing, for epidemiology, and even for visits to Indian-owned casinos. The preliminary evidence is that we are reaching the horizontal area of the curve. Our further research into future policies indicates a shift to bicycle boulevards in order to attract more risk averse riders.
 
*image by Greg Raisman
 
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Peak Pedaling: Has Portland Bicycling reached the Top of the Logistic Curve?

November 2013


Piloting Portland’s MultiModal Arterial Performance System

November 22, 2013 12:00 pm - November 22, 2013 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Shaun Quayle, Kittelson & Associates, Inc.
Topic: Piloting Portland's MultiModal Arterial Performance System

Summary: Shaun will present on the recently completed pilot demonstration of multimodal arterial performance measures for the Portland metro region, as part of the larger regional concept of operations. Treatments include a permanent bike count station on the Springwater Trail, permanent truck classification stations, Bluetooth travel time stations, as well as leveraging existing transit and signal controller data to paint a picture of the collective modal transportation system.  
 
*image by Greg Raisman

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Piloting Portland’s MultiModal Arterial Performance System

Special Seminar: An Analytical Derivation of the Capacity at Weaving Sections

November 20, 2013 11:00 am - November 20, 2013 12:30 pm

Where: ITS Lab, Room 315, PSU Engineering Building
Speaker: Florian Marczak, LICIT, IFSTTAR/ENTPE, University of Lyon

Summary: Weaving sections are discontinuities of the highway network formed when merge segments are closely followed by diverge segments. Because of their geometrical configuration, weaving areas generate numerous lane changes. Those lane changes lead to a reduction of the capacity and affect therefore the operation of weaving sections. 
 
This contribution aims at investigating empirically the lane changing behavior at a weaving section located in Grenoble (France). The data have been collected at a microscopic level, describing the position of every vehicle at every time step (trajectories of each individual vehicle). The data have been measured with a high-resolution camera mounted underneath a helicopter. 
 
From the empirical results, we develop an analytical formulation of the capacity of weaving sections. We consider a theoretical weaving section as the superposition of two merges and two diverges. We assume moreover that the accelerations and slowdowns of weaving vehicles create voids in the traffic stream that reduce the total capacity. The analytical estimation of the capacity is compared with field macroscopic data measured in Grenoble and micro-simulated results.
 
The specification of the needed data sample to extrapolate the results obtained in Grenoble is presented in the last part of the talk. To test the analytical model to other weaving sections and increase its predictive power a key step is to gather individual data from loop detectors. The last part of the talk presents therefore some typical detection configuration to this aim. 
 
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Transportation: From Here to There; How and Who Pays

November 19, 2013 7:00 pm - November 19, 2013 9:00 pm

Where: Multnomah County Building Board Room 501 SE Hawthorne Boulevard

Speakers: George Beard, Alliance Manager, Office of Research and Strategic Partnerships, PSU

Mark Frohnmayer, Oregon Transportation Commission, President, Arcimoto Co.

Carlotta Collette, Metro Councilor, Chair of Joint Policy Advisory Committee on Transportation (JPACT)

Tobias Read, Oregon State Representative, Chair of House Committee on Transportation and Economic Development

Topic: Transportation: From Here to There; How and Who Pays

Summary: The Portland and Oregon ground transportation system is funded and managed by an overlapping, complex series of intergovernmental arrangements including the federal government, state government, local governments and the Metro regional government. What do these intergovernmental arrangements look like? Who’s the leader? When and Why? Do these arrangements impede or facilitate transportation problem solving? What are some ideas for the future? Listen, learn and question these experts, representing our state transportation management and legislative infrastructure, our Metro government and a view of the future.

For more information contact: Ann Mulroney, League of Women Voters of Portland: info@lwvpdx.org

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Cyclist Compliance at Signalized Intersections

November 15, 2013 12:00 pm - November 15, 2013 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center on the Portland State University campus
Speaker(s): Sam Thompson, PSU Graduate Student
Topic: Cyclist Compliance at Signalized Intersections
 
Summary: Although the running of red lights is perceived by motorists as a commonplace behavior for cyclists, little research has been done on the actual rates of cyclist compliance at signalized intersections. Furthermore, little is known about the factors that influence cyclist non-compliance. This research seeks to illuminate the rates of and reasons for infringement against red lights using video footage and survey data from cyclists in Oregon. 
 
Stream the seminar live or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.

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Cyclist Compliance at Signalized Intersections

Why doesn’t that traffic signal ever turn green? An evaluation of roadway markings for cyclists

November 8, 2013 12:00 pm - November 8, 2013 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center on the Portland State University campus
Speaker: Stefan Bussey, PSU CEUG Honors Student
Topic: Why doesn’t that traffic signal ever turn green? An evaluation of roadway markings for cyclists 

Summary: Signalized intersections often rely on vehicle detection to determine when to give a green light. The 2009 Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) includes an on-pavement marking and curbside sign that public agencies can use to indicate where cyclists should position themselves while waiting at an intersection. This presentation reviews the effectiveness of current markings, signs, and other methods used to help cyclists properly position themselves over detection.

 

*image by Greg Raisman

Stream the seminar live or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.

 

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Why doesn’t that traffic signal ever turn green? An evaluation of roadway markings for cyclists

Clouds, Crowds, and Traffic: What 10 emerging Megatrends mean for the future of transportation

November 1, 2013 12:00 pm - November 1, 2013 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center on the Portland State University campus
Speaker: Ted Trepanier, INRIX, Inc.
Topic: Clouds, Crowds, and Traffic: What 10 emerging Megatrends mean for the future of transportation

Summary: Ten new megatrends will be presented with a discussion on the resulting shifts on the transportation industry. Details will include a look on broken trends and the new challenges introduced for transportation planning. Thoughts will also be presented introducing a pivot to the current model being pursued by the Connected Vehicle program. Finally, planners will be challenged to consider a new question for the future of our connected communities, you have to come to hear it.
 
Stream the seminar live or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.
 
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Clouds, Crowds, and Traffic: What 10 emerging Megatrends mean for the future of transportation

October 2013


Congestion Modeling and Mitigation in the National Airspace System

October 25, 2013 12:00 pm - October 25, 2013 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center on the Portland State University campus
Speaker: David Lovell, Associate Professor, University of Maryland
Topic: Congestion Modeling and Mitigation in the National Airspace System

Summary: Dr. Lovell will talk about three projects funded by NASA and the FAA, addressing congestion in the National Airspace System. Dr. Lovell's team developed diffusion-based queuing models of individual airports that could support better building blocks for network-wide congestion models. The advantage of the new models is their flexibility with respect to input distributions. In a study for the FAA, Dr. Lovell's team developed day-of-operations collaboration "languages" suitable for the FAA and individual carriers in order to collectively manage expected airspace disruptions. Finally, he will discuss a study on predictability in the airspace, with a focus on scheduled block times.
 
*image by Simon_sees
 
Stream the seminar live or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.

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Congestion Modeling and Mitigation in the National Airspace System

E-Bikes in the United States

October 18, 2013 12:00 pm - October 18, 2013 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center on the Portland State University campus
Speaker: John MacArthur, Sustainable Transportation Program Manager, OTREC at PSU
Topic: E-Bikes in the United States

Summary: Electric bicycles (e-bikes) are well established in China and other Asian and European countries but have yet to realize their potential in the United States, although recently the number of e-bikes has been growing. Research on the economic, operational, and safety issues of e-bikes in the U.S. is limited. This research aims in part to understand if different bicycling technology, in this case electric assist bicycles or e-bikes, can reduce barriers to bicycling and encourage more bike trips and longer bike trips, and increase the diversity of people bicycling, including people with a disability or chronic injury to bicycle. Some of these barriers include trip distance, topography, time, and rider effort. E-bikes typically resemble a standard pedal bicycle with the addition of a rechargeable battery and electric motor to assist the rider with propulsion. To answer these questions, we conducted an online survey of existing e-bike users on their purchase and use decisions. Results from 553 e-bike users across North America are analyzed here. Results suggest that e-bikes are enabling users to bike more often, to more distant locations, and to carry more cargo with them. Additionally, e-bikes allow people who would otherwise not be able to bike because of physical limitations or proximity to locations, the ability to bike with electric assist.
 
Stream the seminar live or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.
 
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E-Bikes in the United States

Transportation Analysis Informing Transportation Planning and Policy at ODOT

October 11, 2013 12:00 pm - October 11, 2013 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center on the Portland State University campus
Speaker: Alexander Bettinardi, Oregon Department of Transportation
Topic: Transportation Analysis Informing Transportation Planning and Policy at ODOT

Summary: The Transportation Planning Analysis Unit (TPAU) at ODOT helps to provide information to a large variety of transportation plans, projects, and policy questions.  This allows customers to make better informed decisions and to maximize limited resources.  In order to fill this role TPAU and the Oregon modeling community have a fairly large "toolbox" of models and analysis tools and procedures.  This transportation seminar will give an overview of the role and services that TPAU provides and the different tools and processes used to fulfill that role.
 
Stream the seminar live or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.
 
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Transportation Analysis Informing Transportation Planning and Policy at ODOT

Using empirical (real-world) transportation data to extend travel demand model capabilities

October 4, 2013 12:00 pm - October 4, 2013 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center on the Portland State University campus
Speaker: Michael Mauch, Ph.D., Senior Data Analyst, Project Manager, DKS Associates
Topic: Using Empirical (real-world) Transportation Data to Extend Travel Demand Model Capabilities

Summary: Real-world traffic trends observed in PORTAL and INRIX traffic data are used to expand the performance measures that can be obtained from Portland Metro's travel demand model to include the number of hours of congestion that can be expected during a typical weekday and travel time reliability measures for congested freeway corridors.  
 
Stream the seminar live or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.
 
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Using empirical (real-world) transportation data to extend travel demand model capabilities

August 2013


Growing a World-Class Cycling Culture: Lessons from Quebec (Ann Niles Transportation Lecture)

August 26, 2013 6:30 pm - August 26, 2013 7:30 pm

Where: Lincoln Recital Hall, Lincoln Hall, Portland State University, 1620 S.W. Park Ave.

Admission: Free, but space is limited to 240 people.

Sponsors: Initiative for Bicycle and Pedestrian Innovation (IBPI) and Portland State University School of Music

IBPI is pleased to welcome Jean-François Pronovost for the inaugural Ann Niles Transportation Lecture. Pronovost is vice president, development and public affairs for Vélo Québec, where he works on the focus, strategy and development of new projects and partnerships.
 
From 1989 to 2010, he was the executive director of the association division of Vélo Québec. In 1992, he acted as Chief Organizer of the first world-wide conference on bicycling, the Conférence Vélo Mondiale Pro Bike•Velo City, in Montréal. The Technical Handbook of Bikeway Design is among the many technical publications he has edited. Since 1995, he has been involved with the development of the Route Verte, a 5,000-kilometer bike route across Québec, and with the launch of several active transportation initiatives in collaboration with municipalities and the school network.
 
IBPI is a program of OTREC at Portland State. More information on the Niles endowment is here. More information on the lecture and the speaker is here.
 
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Growing a World-Class Cycling Culture: Lessons from Quebec (Ann Niles Transportation Lecture)

Transportation 2.0

August 26, 2013 8:00 am - September 6, 2013 11:59 pm

Where: Online

Presenter: Joshua Skov, Principal and Co-Founder of Good Company

How can we meet our transportation needs more sustainably? What changes are already taking place as a result of markets and technology? Where do we need policy to foster better outcomes? And, what are the sustainable transportation opportunities for businesses, the public sector, and households?

This online workshop, offered by the UO Sustainability Leadership Program, reviews the evolution of transportation from technological, social and public policy perspectives. The content will explore sustainability issues and opportunities related to the transformation underway, in how we provide, plan, and deliver transportation services and systems.

MetroMile is sponsoring full and partial scholarships for this workshop. Contact Jake Pollack, UO Sustainability Leadership Program Manager, jpollack@uoregon.edu for an application by August 12.

MetroMile, a San Francisco startup which markets and sells auto insurance priced according to how much customers drive,raised $10 million this spring, following a previous $4 million fundraising round. The company, which launched service in Oregon in December, provides drivers with a proprietary device called the Metronome. Once plugged into a vehicle's telematics system underneath the dashboard, the Metronome counts miles and also provides data useful in planning trips and improving gas mileage.

For more information, Transportation 2.0 course content and registration visit: http://sustain.uoregon.edu/workshops/course_desc.php?CourseKey=670950

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Transportation 2.0

Comprehensive Bicycle Planning & Design Course (IBPI)

August 26, 2013 7:30 am - August 30, 2013 5:00 pm

The field of bikeway planning is rapidly evolving. This course will bring you up to speed on the cutting edge in practice and research, offering valuable skills for your professional life. It will cover the fundamentals of bikeway planning and design through an intensive week of interactive classroom and field experience. Instructors will integrate transit access and connections, bridges, trail crossings, and other special features into discussions, while using project examples to highlight practical applications of the principles and techniques covered. Effective education and encouragement programs, including public involvement strategies, will also be discussed.

Classroom sessions will include instruction, discussion and application of course content through problem-solving and case studies. Topics will focus on best practices to integrate bicycle and pedestrian facilities into existing transportation networks through planning and design, with an emphasis on safety and user needs.
 
Daily field tours will explore Portland’s “living laboratory” of bicycle and pedestrian facilities to provide first-hand experience of design and operations of facilities and projects discussed in the classroom. There is nothing like actually seeing and riding on a variety of bicycle facility types to facilitate your understanding of their operations and make it easier for you to describe to colleagues and stakeholders back home. Week-long bike rentals are available for an additional fee. Please request the bike rental when registering for the workshop.
 
Our course faculty provides access to some of the nation’s best expertise built up over a 20-year timeframe. Our instructors work together to present and explain issues from different angles.
 
Who should attend? Transportation planners, designers, and engineers responsible for integrating bicycle facilities into community transportation systems, including public roadways and trails.
 
This course is sponsored by the Initiative for Bicycle and Pedestrian Innovation (ibpi) at Portland State University. IBPI promotes pedestrian and bicycle travel through research, education and outreach. Co-Sponsors are Alta Planning + Design, and the City of Portland Bureau of Transportation.
 
The fee for this professional development course is $995. This includes continental breakfast, snacks, lunch, and course materials. The fee does not include travel, lodging or other meals while in Portland.
 
To register, go to commerce.cashnet.com/pdxibpi. Registration deadline is July 31, 2013.
Comprehensive Bicycle Planning & Design Course (IBPI)

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