OTREC's Past Events

August 2014


Evaluating the Level-of-Service of Protected Bike Lanes

September 25, 2014 10:00 am - September 25, 2014 11:15 am

The most recent edition of the Highway Capacity Manual (HCM) contains analysis procedures for measuring the level-of-service (LOS), also referred to as quality of service, provided by an urban roadway to bicyclists. The method uses different design and operating features of the roadway segment (e.g. width, motor vehicle volumes and speeds) to assess an LOS grade of A (best) to F (worst). These procedures are used by planners and engineers to recommend how existing streets could be retrofitted or new streets designed to better serve people on bicycles (and other modes). However, the current HCM does not include methods that address protected bike lanes (aka “cycle tracks” or “separated bike lanes”), only conventional striped bike lanes, shoulders, and shared streets. There are other methods for predicting comfort from a bicyclist’s perspective that do consider protected bike lanes, but they are either based only on expert opinion or on surveys in Denmark.

This presentation will describe how to evaluate the level-of-service of a protected bike lane using results from surveys conducted in the United States. The model developed by this project could be used to supplement the current HCM to objectively consider a wider range of options for improving the environment for bicycling. This is increasingly important as the implementation of, and demand for, protected bike lanes surges around the US.

This seminar is eligible for 1 hour of professional development credit. IBPI applies to the AICP for Certification Maintenance credit for each webinar. We will provide an electronic attendance certificate for other types of certification maintenance.

For more information or to register for this free webinar, click here.

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Symposium Celebrating 50 Years of Traffic Flow Theory

August 11, 2014 7:59 am - August 13, 2014 4:59 pm

Where: David Evans and Associates, 2100 SW River Parkway Portland, OR 97201

Summary: The Transportation Research Board (TRB) Committee on Traffic Flow Theory and Characteristics is pleased to announce the Symposium Celebrating 50 Years of Traffic Flow Theory and Midyear Meeting to be held in Portland, Oregon, USA, August 11-13, 2014. The predecessor committee focusing on traffic flow theory was organized 50 years ago, and this is an appropriate time to recognize the past accomplishments in the field, reflect on the present state of our research community and identify key future directions. Papers on all topics in the traffic flow theory and characteristics domains are welcome. We will be presenting exciting technical and social programs. We sincerely hope you will join us!

Organizing Committee Chair: Robert Bertini, Portland State University. Robert Bertini is a professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Portland State University. From 2009-2011, he served as Deputy Administrator of the Research and Innovative Technology Administration at the U.S. Department of Transportation, and from 2011-2012 he was a visiting professor at the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. A registered professional engineer in Oregon and California, Bertini's experience includes work with local government, several national transportation consulting firms and the auto industry.

Click here to register. Early registration is open now!

Symposium Celebrating 50 Years of Traffic Flow Theory

July 2014


Comprehensive Bicycle Design & Engineering 1.0

July 28, 2014 8:00 am - August 1, 2014 5:00 pm

Comprehensive Bicycle Design & Engineering 1.0
Where: Room 315 (ITS Lab), Engineering Building, Portland State University
Course Faculty: Mia Birk, Alta Planning + Design; Peter Koonce, Portland Bureau of Transportation; and other instructors TBA
Summary: The field of bikeway planning is rapidly evolving. This Initiative for Bicycle and Pedestrian Innovation (IBPI) course will cover the fundamentals of bikeway planning and design through an intensive week of interactive classroom and field experience. It will bring you up to speed on the cutting edge in practice and research and offer valuable skills for your professional life. Instructors will integrate transit access and connections, bridges, trail crossings, and other special features into discussions, while using project examples to highlight practical applications of the principles and techniques covered. Effective education and encouragement programs, including public involvement strategies, will also be discussed.

Topics will include:

    Bicycle and pedestrian master planning
    Bicycle facility design of intersections, crossings, and signals
    Trail design
    Bicycle boulevards
    Data collection
    Bicycle and pedestrian-friendly policy
    Funding opportunities
    Encouragement, education, and enforcement

Daily field tours will explore Portland’s “living laboratory” of bicycle facilities to provide first-hand experience of design and operations of facilities and projects discussed in the classroom. There is nothing like actually seeing and riding on a variety of bicycle facility types to facilitate your understanding of their operations and make it easier for you to describe to colleagues and stakeholders back home. Students must be able to bike up to 10 miles a day, and expect mild elevation. Week-long bike rentals are available for an additional fee. Please request the bike rental when registering for the workshop.

Our course faculty provides access to some of the nation’s best expertise built up over a 20-year timeframe. Our instructors work together to present and explain issues from different angles.

Who Should Attend: Urban planners and transportation engineers, policy makers, advocates and others interested in a broad overview of bicycle design, programs, policy and funding. This class best serves people from communities who are working to develop or implement their first major bicycle master plan. This class has more of a planning focus than in-depth engineering issues.

Registration: The fee for this professional development course is $995. This includes continental breakfast, snacks, lunch, and course materials. The fee does not include travel, lodging or other meals while in Portland.

Registration is currently not open yet. If you'd like to be notified of registration opening, subscribe to the IBPI list.

Continuing Education Credits: This 5-day workshop will provide approximately 32 hours of training which equals to 32 CMs or 32 PDHs. IBPI applies to the AICP for Certification Maintenance credit for each webinar. We will provide an attendance certificate to those who document their professional development hours.
 
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Comprehensive Bicycle Design & Engineering 1.0

Health Impact Assessment (HIA) in Transportation Planning

July 16, 2014 10:00 am - July 16, 2014 11:15 am

Health Impact Assessment (HIA) in Transportation Planning: What to Expect From Planning and Public Health Stakeholders

Free IBPI Webinar
Wednesday, July 16, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:15 AM PST
Instructor: Nicole Iroz-Elardo, Oregon Health Authority, Public Health Division

 

Health impact assessment (HIA) has emerged in the U.S. as a promising way to increase social and environmental justice by addressing health equity within transportation planning.  HIA seeks to augment the information base upon which public decisions are made.  It does so through a multi-disciplinary analysis of how the project or plan impacts various social determinants of health.  It also augments community and stakeholder engagement by providing a forum - usually through an advisory committee - where stakeholders can identify and deliberate about health interests related to the target plan.  While HIA advisory committees are diverse by design, those managing HIA processes are often surprised at the differences between and within both the planning and transportation fields. 

This webinar reviews stakeholder engagement strategies common to HIA.  It compares and contrasts the values, expectations, and methodologies that various types of planning and public health professionals often bring to the table.  Finally, it identifies best practices for stakeholder engagement in HIA to maximize the collaborative nature of HIA.

Continuing Education Credits: This 60-minute webinar provides one hour of training which equals 1 CM or 1 PDH. IBPI applies to the AICP for Certification Maintenance credit for each webinar. We will provide an attendance certificate to those who document their professional development hours.

Configuration: The webinar will be administered through GoToWebinar. The room will be opened 30 minutes before the start of the webinar.

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June 2014


PSU Delft Summer Program

June 28, 2014 8:00 am - July 11, 2014 5:00 pm

Sustainable Transportation in the Netherlands

Faculty: Dr. Robert Bertini (PSU), Dr. Peter Furth (NEU) 


Summary: This popular course offers students a unique learning opportunity. Open to PSU seniors and graduate students from all majors, students immerse themselves in the Netherlands and experience firsthand how pedestrian, bicycle, transit and auto modes can work together and complement each other in a truly liveable way.

Peter Koonce (The City of Portland Bureau of Transportation), the course's original creator, was inspired to develop the curriculum after guest lecturing for a Northeastern University course hosted at TU Delft in 2010. Koonce soon realized that he was involved in a course that he should have taken as an undergraduate, and he pledged to create the same experience for students at PSU.

"At the City of Portland, we had been talking about building better bicycle facilities, but it was hard to imagine them. By visiting with Dutch traffic engineers, you could ask them specific questions on what was working for them and how their design philosophies evolved over time."
Topics include Dutch bicycle facility planning and design, roundabout design, bicycle highways, transit networks, land use and zoning impact on transportation planning, and transit oriented development. In a typical day students meet for an introductory lecture at TU Delft, cycle to a nearby city for a tour led by local planners, engineers and politicians. Students work in small groups on a wiki-based project and also blog about their experiences as part of the course.

A recent article about the course, which recounts the insights and experiences of some former course participants, can be found here.

CE 4/510 (5 credits)
Faculty: Dr. Robert Bertini (PSU), Dr. Peter Furth (NEU)

More information about the course can be found here or by completing this simple form. Non-students interested in participating in the course should contact Dr. Robert Bertini.

Applications are now available through PSU Education Abroad.
 

PSU Delft Summer Program

Health and Transportation Partners: Working to Improve Pedestrian Safety in Oregon

June 11, 2014 11:00 am - June 11, 2014 2:30 pm

Health and Transportation Partners: Working to Improve Pedestrian Safety in Oregon

Safe States Pedestrian Injury Prevention Training and Mini-Grant Opportunity 

Free IBPI Webinar
Wednesday, June 11, 2014
Part 1: 11:00 AM - 12:30 PM PST
Part 2: 1:00 PM -  2:30 PM PST

Join health and transportation partners working in Oregon and learn a variety of ways to improve pedestrian safety in your neighborhood, town or city. Explore the links between health and transportation, the best practices being used to increase the numbers of individuals using active transportation, and how to keep all road users safer. These methods need not necessarily be expensive engineering solutions, but can encompass education, enforcement and some simple fixes.

This webinar is required viewing for taking advantage of a pedestrian safety mini-grant opportunity that will be released in June 2014. Click here to preview the mini-grant program guidelines and application. The webinar will be recorded and a link will be emailed to all registrants after the webinar.

Audience: Those working in public health, pedestrian or bicycle advocacy, law enforcement, community planning, traffic engineering, citizen engagement or other fields that want to get people using active transportation and reduce the risks to users of the system.

Continuing Education Credits: This webinar provides three hours of training which equals 3 CM or 3 PDH. IBPI applies to the AICP for Certification Maintenance credit for each webinar. We will provide an attendance certificate to those who document their professional development hours.

Configuration: The webinar will be administered through GoToWebinar. The room will be opened 30 minutes before the start of the webinar.

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Morning

Afternoon

Health and Transportation Partners: Working to Improve Pedestrian Safety in Oregon

E-Bikes: Generating the New Wave of Cyclists

June 9, 2014 10:00 am - June 9, 2014 11:15 am

E-Bikes: Generating the New Wave of Cyclists

Free IBPI Webinar
Monday, June 9, 2014
10:00 AM - 11:15 AM PST
Instructor: John MacArthur, Sustainable Transportation Program Manager, Oregon Transportation Research and Education Consortium

 

How do we get more people biking and to bike more often? Communities around North America are struggling with this question as they face growing economic, social, health and environmental issues. This webinar aims to explore if adding technology to bicycles can reduce barriers to bicycling (e.g.,  trip distance, topography, time, and rider effort) and encourage more bicycling trips, longer bicycling trips, and increase the diversity of people bicycling, including people with a disability or chronic injury. 

Electric bicycles (e-bikes) are well established in China and other Asian and European countries but market adoption has been slow in the United States.  E-bikes typically resemble a standard pedal bicycle with the addition of a rechargeable battery and electric motor to assist the rider with propulsion. Though research on the economic, operational, and safety issues of e-bikes in North America is limited, the webinar will present information gathered by PSU researchers on the adoption of e-bikes. Results from an online survey of existing e-bike users on their purchase and use decisions will be presented, which suggest that e-bikes are enabling users to bike more often, to more distant locations, and to carry more cargo with them. Additionally, e-bikes seem to allow people who would otherwise not be able to bike, because of physical limitations or proximity to locations, the ability to bike with electric assist.

What is an e-bike? Who is using these bikes and why? What are the barriers that are preventing broader adoption of this technology?  As adoption of e-bikes increases, how should local agencies address the integration of e-bikes with other modes? These questions and more will be explored in this webinar.

The webinar is free through registration; early registration is encouraged. An archived video will also be posted after the webinar. 

Continuing Education Credits: This 60-minute webinar provides one hour of training which equals 1 CM or 1 PDH. IBPI applies to the AICP for Certification Maintenance credit for each webinar. We will provide an attendance certificate to those who document their professional development hours.

Configuration: The webinar will be administered through GoToWebinar. The room will be opened 30 minutes before the start of the webinar.

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E-Bikes: Generating the New Wave of Cyclists

Seminar #394: Transforming Transportation Through Connectivity

June 6, 2014 12:00 pm - June 6, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Robert Bertini, Professor, Portland State University
Topic: Seminar #394: Transforming Transportation Through Connectivity
Summary: The transportation system is the backbone of the United States' economy, and transportation is an essential part of everyday life for American citizens. It is essential that the transportation system continue to provide accessibility and connectivity to an ever-evolving global economy. A key way to do so is to embrace, develop and implement new technologies. One of the newest and most promising facets of transportation-related technology is in the field of connected mobility. The vision behind connected mobility is of a transportation system where vehicles, travelers, and infrastructure are all wirelessly connected with one another and able to transmit real-time data about things like weather, location, and vehicle and infrastructure status. Such a degree of connectivity could have substantial benefits for the safety, mobility, and sustainability of the domestic transportation system, including accident prevention and congestion reduction. In recent years, major strides have been made into the research and development of connected mobility technology and some field-testing has commenced, but there is a need for more attention and investment from stakeholders throughout the transportation community and beyond. 
 
Watch an archived video through the link here.
 
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Seminar #394: Transforming Transportation Through Connectivity

May 2014


GIS Tools for Bicycle Network Analysis and Planning

May 30, 2014 12:00 pm - May 30, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Mike Lowry, Professor, University of Idaho
Topic: GIS Tools for Bicycle Network Analysis and Planning
Summary: This presentation is a showcase of various GIS tools developed for bicycle network analysis and planning. The showcase includes a tool for assessing community-wide bikeability, a tool for forecasting bicycle volumes based on street topology, and a tool for evaluating different bicycle improvement plans in terms of exposure to danger situations for bicyclists. The tools will be demonstrated with case study data. The presentation will include a review of the Highway Capacity Manual Bicycle Level of Service and a discussion about using bicycle and pedestrian data collected through citizen-volunteer count programs.

Stream
the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.

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GIS Tools for Bicycle Network Analysis and Planning

Capturing the Ride: Exploring Low-Density Flexible Transit Alternatives in Salem-Keizer

May 23, 2014 12:00 pm - May 23, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204, Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Darwin Moosavi, MURP, Portland State University
Topic: Capturing the Ride: Exploring Low-Density Flexible Transit Alternatives in Salem-Keizer
Summary: Current fixed-route transit service provided by Salem-Keizer Transit is inefficient in the low-density neighborhoods of West Salem, South Salem, and Keizer. The lack of sidewalks, non-gridded circuitous streets, and large single-family residential lots all contribute to a lack of ridership. As a result, traditional fixed-route transit service is not cost-effective in these areas.  Through a five month planning process, a group of Portland State University graduate students, better known as Paradigm Planning, tackled the task of addressing this problem in each of the three study areas. Paradigm’s planning process explored mode and route options in order to produce a plan that provides innovative and feasible alternatives to current transit service that will better meet the needs of the community. Through an intensive community engagement process, the residents in each neighborhood were given a voice in shaping the future of transit in their neighborhood.
 
Stream the seminar live, or watch an archived video through the link here.
 
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Capturing the Ride: Exploring Low-Density Flexible Transit Alternatives in Salem-Keizer

Just Sustainabilities: Re-Imagining E/quality, Living Within Limits

May 21, 2014 7:00 pm - May 21, 2014 9:00 pm

Where: Native American Student and Community Center, 710 SW Jackson Street, Portland, OR 97201
Speaker: Julian Agyeman, PhD
Topic: Just Sustainabilities: Re-Imagining E/quality, Living Within Limits

Summary: Professor Agyeman will first outline the concept of ‘just sustainabilities.’ He will argue that integrating social needs and welfare offers us a more ‘just,’ rounded, and equity-focused definition of sustainability and sustainable development, while not negating the very real environmental threats we face. He will define just sustainabilities as ‘the need to ensure a better quality of life for all, now and into the future, in a just and equitable manner, whilst living within the limits of supporting ecosystems.’ He will then look at examples of just sustainabilities in practice in the real world focusing on ideas about ‘fair shares’ resource distribution globally; planning for intercultural cities; achieving wellbeing and happiness; the potential in the new sharing economy; and finally the concept of ‘spatial justice’ and how it complements the more established concept of social justice.

Julian Agyeman is Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning at Tufts University, Medford, MA. He is an environmental social scientist whose expertise and current research interests are in the complex and embedded relations between humans and the environment, whether mediated by governmental institutions or social movements, and the effects of this on public policy and planning processes and outcomes, particularly in relation to notions of justice and equity. He is co-founder and Editor-in-Chief of the international journal ‘Local Environment: The International Journal of Justice and Sustainability.’ With over 150 publications, his recent books include ‘Cultivating Food Justice: Race, Class and Sustainability’ (MIT Press 2011) and ‘Introducing Just Sustainabilities: Policy, Planning and Practice’ (Zed Books 2013). In August 2014, his book ‘Incomplete Streets: Processes, Practices and Possibilities’ will be launched by Routledge.

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Just Sustainabilities: Re-Imagining E/quality, Living Within Limits

Of Railroads & Finance:  The Making of Market Society in the Pacific Northwest

May 16, 2014 3:00 pm - May 16, 2014 4:30 pm

Where: Cramer Hall 250 at PSU
Speaker: Mitch Green
Topic: Of Railroads & Finance:  The Making of Market Society in the Pacific Northwest

Summary:
 
Mitch Green was an honors economics student at PSU and is currently finishing a Ph.D. at UMKC. Join us for his seminar presentation "Of Railroads & Finance:  The Making of Market Society in the Pacific Northwest"
 
Economic systems are peculiar to time and place. They are embedded within an institutional fabric. Consequently, it is appropriate to think of them in the general sense as systems of social provisioning. Mitch Green is interested in how the provisioning process in the Pacific Northwest undergoes qualitative change with the rise of market-based activity. More specifically, he examines how the development of the railroads in the region established enduring ties with financiers on the East coast and Europe, and how these ties facilitated the exercise of power for certain individuals central in their respective social networks. These men of railroads and finance acted in an institutional capacity to transform the region we now understand as the Pacific Northwest so that it was conducive to the generation of financial flows in the machine age. In doing so, they set in motion a process of cumulative development that would render the old provisioning process unviable. That is, the non-market provisioning process embedded in the complex of tribal social relations was destroyed and the peoples who flourished within it were displaced. However, the two systems shared a common thread: each bore some direct relationship with the Columbia River Basin. Hence, Green uses the river as his entry point in a framework of analysis that seeks to trace out the many relations that account for such radical change. 
 
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Pedestrian Safety and Culture Change

May 16, 2014 12:00 pm - May 16, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204, Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Ron Van Houten, Western Michigan University
Topic: Pedestrian Safety and Culture Change
Summary: This session will describe the process and results of a NHTSA study that showed a change in driver culture of yielding to pedestrians in crosswalks on a citywide basis. The research won the Pat Waller award from the National Academy of Sciences, Transportation Research Board in January of this year. The approach to changing road user behavior focused on an integrated approach that include Enforcement, Engineering, and Educational efforts that were designed to be dovetailed together and that included a social norming component. Additional information will be provided on engineering solutions that can facilitate changes in pedestrian level of service and safety.

Stream the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.
 
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Pedestrian Safety and Culture Change

Analytical Efficiencies Through the Integration of Modeling and Simulation Tools

May 9, 2014 12:00 pm - May 9, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Steve Perone, PTV Group
Topic: Analytical efficiencies through the integration of modeling and simulation tools
Summary: Linking planning and operations is vital to improving transportation decision making and the overall effectiveness of transportation systems. In this seminar Steve will discuss data and modeling methods supported by the PTV Vision software suite to facilitate integrated planning for operations.

Stream the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.

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Analytical Efficiencies Through the Integration of Modeling and Simulation Tools

Highlights from the Green Lane: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Protected Cycling Facilities

May 2, 2014 12:00 pm - May 2, 2014 1:00 pm

Where: Room 204 of the Distance Learning Center Wing of the Urban Center at PSU
Speaker: Chris Monsere and Jennifer Dill, Professors, Portland State University
Topic: Highlights from the Green Lane: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Protected Cycling Facilities
Summary: Cycling is on the rise across the U.S. and its popularity has grown beyond the usual leaders - Portland, OR, Seattle, WA, Davis, CA, Minneapolis, MN and Boulder, CO. New York City, NY Chicago, IL and Washington, DC are among those cities making significant investments in bike infrastructure in recent years and have realized substantial growth in people taking to the streets on two wheels. This presentation will summarize some results from our comprehensive assessment of the safety, operations, economic impacts, user experience, and perceptions of new protected bikeways in 5 cities U.S. cities (Austin, TX; Chicago, IL; Portland, OR; San Francisco, CA; and Washington, D.C.). To support this research, the team collected and analyzed 204 hours of video, 2,300 returned surveys of residents, and 1,111 returned surveys from people intercepted riding the new facilities.

*image by Greg Raisman

Stream
the seminar live, or watch an archived video, when made available, through the link here.

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Highlights from the Green Lane: A Comprehensive Evaluation of Protected Cycling Facilities

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