Durability Assessment of Recycled Concrete Aggregates for use in New Concrete

Principal Investigator

Jason Ideker, Oregon State University

Co-Investigator(s)

Jennifer E. Tanner, University of Wyoming

Final Report

Durability Assessment of Recycles Concrete Aggregates for Use in New Concrete Phase I - Revised [March 2014]

Summary

Currently the use of recycled concrete as aggregate in the United States is predominately limited to use in pavement base or subbase material and non-structural fill with the remainder being landfilled. As the use of natural aggregate sources diminishes and the public demands the use of green materials, the potential for use of recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) will continue to rise. However, the use of RCA in concrete paving mixtures and structural applications is hindered by a myriad of reasons including a lack of technical data related to long-term performance, particularly durability aspects, a lack of guidance related to…

Currently the use of recycled concrete as aggregate in the United States is predominately limited to use in pavement base or subbase material and non-structural fill with the remainder being landfilled. As the use of natural aggregate sources diminishes and the public demands the use of green materials, the potential for use of recycled concrete aggregates (RCA) will continue to rise. However, the use of RCA in concrete paving mixtures and structural applications is hindered by a myriad of reasons including a lack of technical data related to long-term performance, particularly durability aspects, a lack of guidance related to quality control and quality assurance as well as a general perception that recycled concrete as aggregate is a "sub-standard" concrete component and should thus be avoided. Fundamental research has elucidated many of the potential issues with the use of recycled concrete aggregate in flatwork and structural applications. However, there is little information related to the long-term durability of this type of concrete. In particular the potential for alkali-silica reaction (ASR) in new concrete including RCA was identified by several states as a major research need in a recent FHWA study. The objective of this project is to perform advanced research to determine methodologies that can be used to detect the potential for ASR in representative concrete pavement including RCA. Specific objectives include: - Identify accelerated laboratory testing methods that will provide prediction of ASR in concrete including RCA. - Verify mitigation strategies through performance testing that will ensure durability of mixtures containing RCA where ASR could potentially limit long-term performance - Generate bench-marking data crucial for the acceptance of RCA in paving and structural concrete mixtures - Provide national guidance through OTREC published reports and presentations at select conferences for quality assurance and quality control measures related to ASR and the use of RCA - Expand existing literature and state-of-knowledge in this area and bring new expertise to the state of Oregon related to the long-term durability of concrete incorporating RCA To accomplish the research objectives a thorough literature review will be conducted to analyze current research related to RCA and long-term durability. An experimental approach will be focus on mixture design and selection, identification of RCA sources, testing protocols and methodologies for mitigation. One of the major outcomes will be to provide guidance for quality control and quality assurance measures that can be adopted at the state and federal level to detect the potential for ASR and to provide mitigation measures to prevent ASR in concrete containing RCA. This research will help erode the perception that RCA is a "sub standard" material and will show that it can be effectively used in concrete mixtures when the right measures are taken to assess and predict its performance. Presentations at national conferences (TRB, ACI, ACPA, etc.) will provide national awareness of project outcomes.

 

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Project Details

Year: 2010
Project Cost: $68,492
Project Status: Completed
Start Date: October 1, 2009
End Date: December 31, 2010
Theme:
TRB RiP: 22860

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OTREC by the Numbers

  • Total value of projects funded: $12.2 million
  • Number of projects funded: 153
  • Number of faculty partners: 98
  • Number of external partners participating in OTREC: 46

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